Professor Donald McDonald at San Francisco is one of the pioneers in vascular field and received several distinguished honors including Judah Folkman Memorial Lectureship. His laboratory has revealed cellular mechanisms of vascular and lymphatic changes involved in cancer and chronic inflammation and contributed to the understanding on the disease pathophysiology. Recent findings by his group include effects of oncolytic vaccinia virus infection of endothelial cells on tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell killing, invasion, and metastasis. He will talk about endothelial heterogeneity in normal and pathological contexts.
  • Chairperson
  • • Gou Young Koh (KAIST / IBS, Korea)
    • 09:20-10:00
    Anne Eichmann has studied the cellular and molecular mechanisms of barrier function between blood and lymphatic vessels. She would discuss about novel effectors of two critical barriers with opposing functions, the blood-brain barrier forming very tight junctions and the lymphatic capillary barrier uptaking extravasated fluid, macromolecules and immune cells.
  • Chairperson
  • • Hyo-Soo Kim (Seoul National University, Korea)
    • 10:00-10:40
    Professor Ralf Adams directing Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine at Muenster is one of the recognized investigators leading organotypic vascular morphogenesis. His group focuses on the vertebrate vascular system, in which blood vessels need to integrate precisely into different organ environments and retain plasticity allowing them to adapt to changing requirements and signals. Work of his laboratory has provided fundamental insight into the molecular regulation of angiogenesis and, in particular, the functional roles of endothelial cells and pericytes. Their studies have also contributed to the elucidation of disease processes and have identified the genetic cause of several human syndromes. He will update organ-specific and functional specialization of vascular cells.
  • Chairperson
  • • Young-Guen Kwon (Yonsei University, Korea)
    • 11:00-11:40
    Professor Hyo-Soo Kim, M.D., Ph D, FAHA, graduated from Seoul National University in South Korea and is currently the President of The Seoul National University Hospital Biomedical Research Institute. He is a pioneer in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as he has developed and conducted Cytokine-Stem Cell combination Therapy for myocardial infarction patients for the first time in the world. In recognition of his achievements of implementing translational research in the field of cardiovascular and stem cell biology, he has won numerous prestigious awards including the Asan Award in Medicine and the Wunsch Medical Award. His topic will cover new mechanisms of pathogenesis for diseases such as metabolic syndrome, fatty liver, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes by presenting his latest new findings on Restin-PCSK9-CAP1. In his presentation, he will discuss the development of a new treatment that can prevent Resistin-CAP1 signal from metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, he will also highlight how this treatment could prevent PCSK9 occurring from vessel inflammation
  • Chairperson
  • • Goo Taeg Oh (Ewha Womans University, Korea)
    • 11:40-12:20
    Professor Kari Alitalo directing translational cancer medicine research at Helsinki is a pioneer in vascular field. His group isolated and characterized the arterial endothelial tyrosine kinase Bmx, Tie1 angiopoietin receptor, lymphangiogenic receptor VEGFR3, and the first lymphangiogenic growth factor, VEGF-C, and characterized VEGF-B as a growth factor for coronary and adipose vasculature. His group demonstrated VEGF-C induced tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis, and inhibitors of the VEGFR-3 signal transduction pathway, which are in phase 2 clinical trials in age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema, and developed growth factor therapy for lymphedema, which is now in phase 2 clinical trial. A recent finding by his laboratory was the discovery of meningeal lymphatic vessels. He will present recent findings on lymphagiogenesis mechanisms and translational approaches.
  • Chairperson
  • • Jun-Kyu Suh (Inha University, Korea)
    • 08:30-09:10
    Professor Mark Kahn at Philadelphia is a practicing cardiologist with a full-time laboratory that studies cardiovascular development and function. His lab has a long-standing interest in vascular biology and identified numerous players, including MEKK3-KLF2/4 signaling and PDCD10, and hemodynamic regulation that dictate blood and lymphatic vascular development and diseases. He will talk about his recent translational interests associated with cerebral cavernous malformation, deep venous thrombosis, and other vascular diseases.
  • Chairperson
  • • Kyu-Won Kim (Seoul National University, Korea)
    • 09:10-09:50
    Variants in genes encoding components of angiopoietin-Tie2/TEK signaling have been identified in patients with glaucoma. Susan Quaggin would highlight the central role of Angiopoietin-Tie2/TEK signaling and trabecular meshwork-Schlemm's canal crosstalk in intraocular pressure homeostasis and provide new candidates for Schlemm's canal-targeted glaucoma therapy.
  • Chairperson
  • • Young Myeong Kim (Kangwon National University, Korea)
    • 13:30-14:10
    For nearly four decades, Dr. Jain’s work has focused on one challenge: improving the delivery and efficacy of anti-cancer therapeutics. Working on the hypothesis that the abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression and treatment resistance, Dr. Jain developed an array of sophisticated imaging technologies and animal models as well as mathematical models. Using these tools, they demonstrated that the blood and lymphatic vasculature, fibroblasts, immune cells and the extracellular matrix associated with tumors are abnormal. Dr. Jain then hypothesized that agents that induce “normalization” of the microenvironment can improve the treatment outcome. The normalization hypothesis has now been validated by a number of laboratories worldwide and has changed the thinking about how antiangiogenic agents work. He’ll discuss “normalizing” strategies developed in his laboratory.
  • Chairperson
  • • Ho Jeong Kwon (Yonsei University, Korea)
    • 08:30-09:10
    Issei Komuro has elucidated mechanisms involved in several cardiovascular diseases such as cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and aortic aneurism. In this symposium, he would introduced novel players involved in pulmonary hypertension characterized by occlusion or narrowing of the pulmonary artery and Marfan syndrome with various abnormalities including aortic aneurysm and dissection.
  • Chairperson
  • • Jin Han (Inje University, Korea)
    • 09:10-09:50
    Dr. Peter Libby is a Professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Mallinckrodt Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is a world-famous scientist in the vascular biology and cardiology. He is also the author of some 400 original peer-reviewed publications, some 450 reviews, chapters, or other publications, Dr. Libby also serves as an Editor of the leading textbook of cardiovascular medicine. Dr. Libby's clinical and research interests include vascular biology, atherosclerosis and preventive cardiology. His laboratory has investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms of atherosclerosis. His recent works have been focused on defining a newly recognized, common, and potent cardiovascular risk factor, clonal hematopoiesis. Based on the recent findings, he will talk about clonal hematopoiesis associated with aging, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.
  • Chairperson
  • • Hyo-Soo Kim (Seoul National University, Korea)
    • 16:50-17:30
    Dr. Silvio Inzucchi is a professor of medicine (endocrinology) at Yale School of Medicine and the clinical director of the section of endocrinology. Dr. Inzucchi’s research interests have been concerned with the cardiovascular effects of diabetes medications and glucose management. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality for individuals with diabetes and is the largest contributor to the direct and indirect costs of diabetes. The common conditions coexisting with type 2 diabetes (e.g., hypertension and dyslipidemia) are clear risk factors for CVD, and diabetes itself confers independent risk. In IVBM 2020, he will deliver a lecture entitled “CV Risk Reduction with Diabetes Medications: In Search of the Holy Grail” based on his keen insights.
  • Chairperson
  • • Joong Yeol Park (University of Ulsan, Korea)
    • 17:30-18:10
    Dr. John. J. V. McMurray is a Professor of Medical Cardiology and Deputy Director of the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow, UK and honorary Consultant Cardiologist at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow. Dr. McMurray’s research interests are in heart failure, coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation and the cardiovascular consequences of diabetes and chronic kidney disease, with a focus on clinical trials and epidemiology. He has been a member and chair of many guideline committees and the lead author of the World Health Organization and first Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network Guidelines on the Management of Heart Failure. In IVBM 2020, he will deliver a lecture entitled “Heart Failure: Are We Winning?” based on his scientific research experience.
  • Chairperson
  • • Kyong Soo Park (Seoul National University, Korea)
    • 13:40-14:20
    Dr. Jane E. Freedman is the Edward Budnitz Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine at Massachusetts Medical School. She is also the Editor-in-Chief of Circulation Research. The major topics in Dr. Freedman’s lab are the regulation of pathways contributing to atherothrombotic disease and how these factors contribute to acute coronary syndromes. Dr. Freedman lab is also focused on a basic science that examines the role of immunity, infection, and inflammation on atherothrombotic disease. Today, she will share the latest knowledge on the relationship of infection, inflammation, and vascular occlusion.
  • Chairperson
  • • Sang Hong Back (The Catholic University of Korea, Korea)
    • 14:20-15:00